Siding Alternatives According to Remodeling Magazine’s 2014 Cost + Value report, homeowners who replace their siding can recoup up to 78.2% of their costs, depending on the material, installation costs and region. But when it’s time to replace your exterior home siding there are many options to choose from. Whether you just want to increase the value of your home with a fresh look or if you’ve suffered damage due to weather, insects or just general deterioration, this home improvement project will pay off in the long run.

 

So where do you start? Obviously, price will be a huge factor in your decision. But price alone can’t be your only guide – you have to ask yourself, “What will I get for the price?” Here are factors you’ll want to consider when looking at your siding options:

  • Durability
  • Maintenance requirements
  • Appearance and selection
  • Availability
  • Warranties
  • Resale value

Your siding options include:

Vinyl Siding

Vinyl siding is generally the most affordable type of siding and it’s available in many styles and price points. Warranties vary with the quality of the product selected. It’s not as durable as other siding options, often requiring replacement within 25 years. However, it does offer easy maintenance and does not require regular painting. Vinyl siding for an average two- story house generally costs between $8,000 and $16,000.

Fiber Cement Siding

Fiber Cement Siding StyleThis is a relatively new product in the siding world. It’s more expensive but looks rich. Fiber cement is made of wood pulp, cement, and a mix of clay and sand. It can be molded to look like wood clapboard, shingles, stucco or masonry, so you have a large variety of styles to choose from. You can change the color if you ever get tired of it. You can figure 15 years between paint jobs with this material. Since it’s new to the market, you may have problems finding contractors who have experience with the product so be sure to ask for references if you go with this option. Depending on the manufacturer, most fiber cement products are not developed specifically for your climate zone. Be sure the product you choose is developed to hold up in the harsh conditions of your specific geographical area. Expect to pay $13,000 to $24,000 for an average two-story house.

Steel Siding

Siding made of steel costs more than vinyl but stays looking good longer. It also requires less cleaning and hangs straighter than vinyl. Steel resists fire, rot and insects. Very durable, it can last up to 40 years or the life of the building. Steel siding for an average two story house will generally cost between $10,000 and $19,000.

Aluminum Siding

Aluminum siding is durable in cold weather climates. Like steel siding, it is also resistant to fire, rot and insects.  However, it is rarely used because it is generally more expensive than vinyl and steel, fades and dents easily. Aluminum siding for an average two story house will generally cost between $15,000 and $24,000.

Wood Siding

83590594Few materials are as beautiful and eye catching as wood but it is expensive and requires significant upkeep. It can also rot or deteriorate. Maintenance is high so be prepared to invest time and money regularly if you plan to go with wood. Costs vary depending on the wood and region of the country.

Brick and Stone Siding

Very durable, easy to maintain and attractive, brick and stone have been a popular options for home exteriors for centuries. Both materials are at the top end of the home exterior siding pricing but they will last a lifetime and add significant value to your home. Prices vary based on material and region.

Finding The Right Siding Contractor

New siding will improve the curb appeal and increase the value of your home as long as it’s done right. A licensed and insured contractor should always handle major home improvements. For more information about finding the best local contractor for your next home improvement project, download this FREE Guide, Iowa Contractor Comparison Guide – How to Make Your Remodeling Project a Success.

Iowa Contractor Comparison Guide